ORANGE Asks: Sound on Sound Festival

Fans mourning the loss of long-running Fun Fun Fun Festival will hopefully find peace and closure at this weekend’s first Sound on Sound Fest.

By ORANGE Music Staff

The three-day event is held at Sherwood Forest Faire with renaissance fair vibes, local nightly after shows and an amazing festival lineup to match. The balanced mix of alternative favorites and solid up-and-coming acts is put on by the same booking team from Fun Fun Fun Festival.

To prep for the fest, ORANGE polled our favorite acts for their most intimate and silly secrets.

 

Kero Kero Bonito

Photo courtesy of Charlotte Rutherford Photography

Photo courtesy of Charlotte Rutherford Photography

Kero Kero Bonito, a British band out of London, fuses bubblegum J-pop and electronic dancehall to create a buoyant, videogame-esque sound. Combining sweet, digital beats with Japanese vocals, the trio’s first priority is fun. The band is currently touring in support of their new sophomore album “Bonito Generation.” The band consists of vocalist Sarah Midori Perry and producers Gus Lobban and Jamie Bulled.

Kero Kero Bonito will play at Sound on Sound Fest on Sunday, Nov. 6 at the Forest Stage from 6:05 to 6:50 p.m.

 

What was your favorite toy when you were little?

Perry: Thomas the Tank Engine train set. I used to connect the tracks to the kitchen and send drawings to my mum on a train.

Lobban: SNES [Super Nintendo Entertainment System].

Bulled: TV remote.

 

What color is your music?

Perry: Black, white, green or blue.

 

If you were a kitchen appliance, what would you be and why?

Perry: Blender.

 

When and where was your first kiss?

Perry: When I was 13, in my room. I shared a bedroom with my brother, but he was asleep.

Lobban: In a Bromley cinema during “Live Free or Die Hard.”

Bulled: I'm saving myself.

 

What food best describes your band?

Perry: Frog legs sprinkled with bonito flakes.

 

BoomBaptist

Photo courtesy of BoomBaptist

Photo courtesy of BoomBaptist

Local Austin artist BoomBaptist (aka Andrew Thaggard) experiments with a diverse spectrum of sounds, combining genres such as hip-hop, instrumental, electronica and soul. He is described as a musical chameleon and often juxtaposes sounds from today’s music with those from the past. BoomBaptist is currently working on his debut LP, which is set to drop later this year.

He will be playing on Sunday, Nov. 6 at the Forest Stage from 2:20-2:50 pm.

 

What’s the best compliment you’ve ever received?

“Don’t show your belly to the crowd.”– Japanese promoter after I did a belly roll in a Tokyo performance.

 

What’s your weirdest tour experience?

I went on tour with two rappers and a DJ. It was the craziest clash of egos. The DJ and I sat in the back of the van and the two rappers in the front, and we never really talked to one another until soundchecks.  

 

If you were stranded on a deserted island, what would you use to craft an instrument and what kind of music would you play?

I would capture a sound wave in the air with a small box, add an envelope to it with my waving hands and get it stuck in some sort of LOST-like feedback loop, then play the longest chord known to man and it would summon a tidal wave that would carry me all the way to Red Lobster.

 

What is your spirit animal and why?

Fox because I see them in the graveyard next to my house all the time and they jump really tight.

 

What would be your dream collaboration?

Some sort of endless multi-part movement performed entirely by my family line.

 

ORTHY

Photo courtesy of Annie Gunn

Photo courtesy of Annie Gunn

Orthy is the brainchild of Austin-based multi-instrumentalist and Sound On Sound Fest co-founder, Ian Orth. Cranking out sleek, textural synth-pop jams since his 2011 album “Sueños,” Orthy has gradually developed a sound sure to get bodies moving, whether playing in the confines of a dank club or the wide-open space of the festival stage. Catch them at on the Forest Stage at 3:10 PM.

 

What is your earliest memory?

Orth: Falling down a set of stairs when I was sitting in one of those toddler seats with wheels on the legs. I've been channeling Chevy Chase ever since.

 

If you could only watch, read or listen to one book, movie or CD for the rest of your life, what would it be and why?

Orth: If I had to listen Brian Eno's “Another Green World” on repeat everyday for the rest of my life, I'd be totally cool with that. It's essentially a perfect album and has enough of everything to, hopefully, never get stale.

That feeling would apply to Slash's autobiography as well. It would be a steady reminder that even though I was stuck listening to the same record and reading the same book for the rest of my life, I should always avoid heroin.

 

What is the band's patronus?

Orth: Currently, a sloth, since it seems I'm taking my sweet time finishing this record.

 

What is the best gift you've received from a fan?

Orth: A snickers bar. I was craving satisfaction and this fan and that bar really delivered.

 

What place have you yet to play that you are dying to visit?

Orth: Japan. I'm a little obsessed with the country and culture, both their traditional and popular culture. Not to mention all the record shopping.  

 

Fragile Rock

Photo courtesy of Fragile Rock

Photo courtesy of Fragile Rock

Through his beliefs that music and comedy have the power to unify people, Brently Heibron has manifested the emo puppet band Fragile Rock. Heibron has been writing and performing music since his early teens, opening for Paul McCartney and working with Woody Allen. After going through an ugly divorce, Heibron created Fragile Rock as an outlet for all of his emotions. He wants to treat his puppets like an actual band and make music that makes people laugh, cry or anything in between.

ORANGE got in touch with Heibron leading up to Fragile Rock’s performance at  on Nov. 5 on the Globe Stage at 1 p.m.

 

What is your collective spirit animal?

A grackle eating your queso.

 

If you could have dinner with anyone, dead or alive, who would it be?

David Bowie.

 

 

What color is your music?

Black with sparkles.

 

What is the most embarrassing thing currently on your Netflix queue?

Grease 2. Sorry, not sorry.

 

If you were a kitchen appliance, what would you be and why?

My coffee maker– Kicking out the jams that keep me going.

 

Calliope Musicals

Photo courtesy of Jerry Sparkman

Photo courtesy of Jerry Sparkman

Hailing from Austin, Calliope Musicals are a live force to be reckoned with. Blending their high-octane, relentlessly positive indie pop with a sense of theatricality that is unparalleled in the local scene, Calliope Musicals have been capturing the eyes and ears of audiences across the country with their latest record, “Time Owes You Nothing”.

For those looking to achieve euphoria while being blasted by waves of confetti at this year’s Sound On Sound Fest, groove on over to the Dragon’s Lair stage at 2:20 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 4 to get things kicked off. ORANGE polled frontwoman Carrie Fussell as well as Craig Finkelstein, Chris Webb and Andrew Vizzone of the 6-piece act.

 

If the band was a mythical creature, what would it be?

Finkelstein: Pegacorn, a unicorn and Pegasus hybrid.

Webb: I would have to go with Tigerwolf. It's an honorable creature, always keeps their word and has a pretty good sense of humor by mythical creature standards.

Vizzone: I would say the Siren, and not in a malicious way like in “The Odyssey” and most Greek mythology, but more so because I like to imagine our show being something so trance-like that one can't help but zombify their way to our stage and join in on our shenanigans.  

 

“A Hard Day's Night”-esque movie is made involving your band. What is the synopsis of the movie?

Fussell: We hop in our rainbow machine after a gig and go on a “Harold and Kumar”-inspired quest for Waffle House. When we get there, we have to save the employees from the evil Pancake King and then we celebrate with pecan waffles and extra crispy hashbrowns.

 

What is your dream collaboration?

Fussell: St. Vincent and zombie Freddie Mercury

Finkelstein: Beck and Jeff Lynne. You could call it Jeff Beck, but that's already taken.

Webb: We already did this one once on a long drive up the West Coast. I would have Tom Morello on guitar, Steve Martin on the banjo, Bill Murray and all the members of The Bangles would cover vocals, Victor Wooten on bass and Regina Spektor on keys and synth.

 

What album can you not stop listening to right now?

Carrie: “The Idler Wheel…” by Fiona Apple.

 

If you could visit any planet in the solar system, which would it be and why?

Fussell: I would go to Saturn and finish my rock opera and luge around the rings for eternity. My luge would have long betta fish tails that fly behind me, and from a distance, would make the colors of the rings change.

Finkelstein: I would absolutely go find Pluto and cheer him up.  I've long been worried for the little dwarf planet when we, as all superior beings [eye-roll] took it upon ourselves to kick Pluto out of our solar system. So, I would go find him, secretly give him a VIP wristband (like we all do for our friends for Austin City Limits) and invite him back into the club.  

 

Shannon and the Clams

Photo courtesy of Shannon and the Clams

Photo courtesy of Shannon and the Clams

Shannon and the Clams are a theatrical garage-punk trio from Oakland, California. The band consists of Shannon Shaw on bass, Cody Blanchard on guitar and Nate Mahan on drums. All three contribute vocally to their indie sound. Listening to their music, one may feel transported to the 60s due to their vintage instrumentals and traditional yet unique songwriting. Blanchard, a lover of dark story writing and horror movies, started song-writing in junior high and met Shaw in art school. ORANGE received answers from Blanchard.

You can catch Shannon and The Clams on Friday, Nov. 4 at the Dragon’s Lair.

 

What's the last book you read?

“Child of God” by Cormack McCarthy.

 

What food best describes you?

Lasagna because of the mysterious and hidden insides.

 

What album can you not stop listening to right now?

“Anti” by Rihanna. It's so dark.

 

If you were a kitchen appliance, what would you be and why?

Immersion blender. It’s small, flexible, surprisingly quiet and it sneaks right into the middle, mixes things up and squishes it all together.

 

What's the best gift anyone ever gave you?

A handmade, custom 12-string guitar.

 

Small Black

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Gavillet

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Gavillet

Brooklyn based indie-rock band Small Black is made up of Josh Kolenik, Ryan Heyner, Juan Pieczanski and Jeff Curtin. The band is set to play from 5 to 5:45 p.m. on the Keep Stage on Friday, Nov. 5.

Small Black is currently touring for their latest album “Best Blues.” Check out their website for their new LP that features recent single "Boys Life,"  plus upcoming shows and music. ORANGE chatted with lead singer and guitarist Josh Kolenik.

 

What’s your weirdest tour experience?

On our first tour, we exploded our van on the Pacific Coast Highway in Santa Barbara and had to drive around in a Uhaul. The problem is a Uhaul only holds 3 people in the cabinet, and there are four of us in the band. So Juan volunteered to sleep in the back with the gear. We bundled him up in t-shirts, gave him a six pack and told him to knock once if he needed to stop and twice if he was gonna die.

 

If you could compete in an Olympic sport, which would you compete in and why?

Water Polo, because the endurance involved in swimming the amount these people do dumbfounds me. Ski jump is a close second, for the pure danger and flying combo.

 

What is your collective spirit animal?

Definitely a raccoon. Marlon Brando had a pet raccoon named Richard that he kept in his apartment in Times Square in the 40s. He pretty much tore the place up everyday when Brando left. Too wild to be tamed.

 

What color is your music?

I think we started in the pink and purple zone back in the day, but have evolved towards deep blue for the water, rain, night-time sky and the blues.

 

What’s the best compliment you’ve ever received?

A couple in Texas played our song “No Stranger” as their wedding song last year, which, to me, is as high praise as you can get.